GM wants to build comprehensive hydrogen infrastructure

GM wants to build comprehensive hydrogen infrastructure-build

General Motors intends to offer its fuel cell technology far beyond use in vehicles and greatly expand its possible uses. As the car manufacturer reports, the mobile and stationary energy systems called Hydrotec were developed to supply electric cars, construction sites and data centers with electricity, to support the military and also to provide emergency power. Further Hydrotec projects, which are currently still in development, are also in preparation, for example for use in heavy commercial vehicles through to aerospace and locomotives.

As part of its planned growth as a platform innovator, GM has now announced new commercial applications of its Hydrotec fuel cell technology. For example:

  • A mobile power generator for providing fast load options for electric cars without installation of permanent charging points
  • A fast charging station called Empower, which should make it easier to set up DC fast charging where the power grid cannot be expanded
  • A mobile power generator for quiet and efficient power supply of military camps and installations

The various fuel cell generators are ultimately intended to replace gas and diesel generators. Possible areas of application include construction sites, film and TV sets, data centers, outdoor concerts and festivals. The generators could also provide power for residential and small commercial businesses during times of power outages. Depending on the configuration, the Hydrotec power generators have an output of 60 to 600 kilowatts.

GM wants to build comprehensive hydrogen infrastructure-infrastructureGeneral Motors
The Empower fast charging station, powered by eight GM Hydrotec cubes, can charge up to four vehicles with 150 kW each at the same time. The hydrogen tanks are big enough to fully load more than 100 e cars.

Related articles

Please follow and like us:

4 thoughts on “GM wants to build comprehensive hydrogen infrastructure”

  1. From the article:

    “General Motors wants to offer its fuel cell technology far beyond use in vehicles…”

    You can obviously count on GM too 😉

    Since there is still no »Physics 2.0″ has gained the upper hand.. 😛 … there is also three times the electricity consumption for the chain H2 generation, storage and electricity generation compared to. purely battery-electric systems and the less weight-sensitive, land-based traffic could only be achieved there with a higher TCO (additionally maintenance-intensive!) operate H2 systems – always apart from niche solutions.

    “The various fuel cell generators are ultimately intended to replace gas and diesel generators.”

    As long as green hydrogen is also used, I don’t see any fundamental problem.

    Reply
  2. GM, like all other burners OEMs, missed the train at the electromobility and now hitchelt behind as long as it still works.
    It’s the same story in energy storage – the power plant in Hornsdale Australia runs on megapacks (batteries 🙂 ) profitable for years.
    More lighthouse projects like this are popping up on almost every continent – like mushrooms after a summer rainstorm.
    People are slowly starting to think outside the box of automobiles and have now finally taken a look at the energy sector – again a bit too late 😉
    And it will work, just like with cars – people are now focusing on the next “big” thing – hydrogen as a storage device at charging stations.

    I think Tesla has already won the race there with the Powerpacks and Megapacks.
    In reality, they have been around for several years 🙂

    It may not matter at first glance, as you supply a charging column somewhere in the pampa – with the power supplier hydrogen or a battery pack.

    – The exciting question is how to “bring” the energy there in the future and how much it will cost.
    Do I lay a power cable or a pipeline or even send a tanker truck with hydrogen on the long journey, as has always been the case up to now? 🙁

    Of course I can produce both electricity and hydrogen decentrally with a wind turbine or PV – but physics also plays a role here.0 again a role:

    The wind turbine or a PV field simply has to produce five times more energy for hydrogen before it finally reaches the consumer.

    On the subject of predictions, take a look at today’s “Best in Tesla” article – three years ago, a certain Mark Spiegel made statements about Tesla’s competitors that every Tesla fanboy almost falls off his stool with laughter today 🙂

    We will see in 3 years who then (again?) laughs

    Time wants Tell

    Reply
  3. GM probably doesn’t have it that way with electric cars (BEV), rather a hydrogen infrared bar, GM still hopes that in 2024 the new President will be Donald Trump and electric cars will only remain a niche if you don’t put an end to them can do like in the 1990s.

    Reply
  4. GM probably doesn’t have it that way with electric cars (BEV), preferring to build a hydrogen infrastructure. Apparently, GM still hopes that in 2024 the new President will be Donald Trump and that electric cars will only remain a niche if they cannot be prevented entirely – as in the 1990s.

    There will probably only be a real breakthrough in electric cars in the USA without Trump. The question remains how many lost years there will be in the US – 2 (by 2024), 6 (by 2028) or even more years?

    Reply

Leave a Comment