Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous

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Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-dangerous

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Monaco Grand Prix 1964, view of the royal box with Gracia Patricia and Rainier. The protective guardrail, later standard on most racetracks, was only shortly before the start and also only erected directly in front of the gallery.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-dangerous

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The charm of improvisation: the racing overalls of Jochen Mass and his teammate Jacky Ickx will go to the pit wall to dry after washing in Le Mans in 1985hangs.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Porsche fishes Formula waters Porsche

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Image of horror: Jim Clark’s demolished Lotus, in which the Briton had an accident. Photographer Eisele met the champion from 1963 and 1965 at a victory celebration in Stuttgart.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-dangerous

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The photo of the preparations for the start of the Grand Prix at the Nurburgring in 1968, on which race director Mauro Forgieri gives his driver Jacky Ickx final instructions, is also adorned Cover of the book "Motor Racing Photography".

Source: www.workingart.gallery

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Porsche fishes Formula waters Porsche

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Jim Clark just before the accident.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-photography

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Ferrari team boss Luca di Montezemolo (left) conjures up Niki Lauda at the 1975 Monaco Grand Prix: "Bring back the title for me and the Scuderia."ahr promptly world champion for the first time.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Source Werner Eisele Werner Eisele

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Last stop in front of the Ferrari box: Wolfgang Graf Berghe von Trips at the 1000 kilometer race on the Nurburgring. In a raincoat with a hat facing the Ferrari: Enzo Ferrari. On deOn the gallery, pilot Graham Hill (3rd from left) and a BP mechanic take an interested look at the competitors.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-formula

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Werner Eisele, racing legends, exclusively for Welt am Sonntag

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-formula

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Jacky Ickx prepares for the 1973 French Grand Prix. To be prepared against the extreme heat, he dissolves salt tablets in water.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-photography

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The original setting for the film “Grand Prix” at the 1966 Grand Prix of Holland. The audience can stroll unhindered on the roofs of the team garages.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-photography

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François Cevert, Jackie Stewart’s team-mate at Tyrell, and his wife Helen Stewart are looking forward to the start of the 1971 German Grand Prix.

Source: Werner Eisele

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-wild

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Werner Eisele presented Formula 1 Champion Michael Schumacher 2005 his book "Formula 1 Legends", which is now out of print.

Source: Werner Eisele

Werner Eisele has been photographing Formula 1 for decades. He has seen stars like Jim Clark and Jochen Rindt win and die. Now he is presenting a new illustrated book about the legends of yore.

A.When Werner Eisele reached the scene of the accident, the spectators had already tucked their trophies under their arms. In a wooded area on the Hockenheimring, they pick up crumbled body parts and scraps of tires from the loamy soil. Eisele approaches the fans, snatches the macabre souvenirs from them and drapes everything as it must have looked immediately after the heavy impact. Then Eisele presses the shutter release on his box-shaped Hasselblad camera.

It was Jim Clark who lost his life in a minor Formula 2 race on April 7, 1968. The relatively filigree lotus shatters on a beech tree, presumably as a result of a cracked suspension. “I still have the metallic thud in my ears. The car lay in front of me like a killed animal, a shiver ran down my spine, I wasn’t ashamed of my tears, ”says Werner Eisele.

New dream car made of old substance

Workshop operator, blogger for rear-engined sports cars and Porsche enthusiast: Daniel Schafer from Erkrath built a kind of custom 911 GT racer from a 1966 912 in a total restoration. Source: PS blog

The London Public Prosecutor’s Office confiscated the film with Clark’s lifeless body and has not got it back to this day. The image of the demolished racing car has stayed with him.

Porsche as a living room

Before Formula 1 became a big spectacle and even bigger business, motorsport was about more than commerce, victory and defeat. It was about survival. Race after race, a battle of man against man, man and machine against the laws of nature broke out. Whoever wanted to triumph had to face death unimpressed.

Eisele, 76, has documented the pilots in their dangerous pursuit, his now out of print illustrated book "Formula 1 Legends" has been elevated to a standard work in the industry, now he has a new homage "Motor Racing Photography" (Working Art, 324 pages, 89 euros). "I want to pay tribute to the people in racing that I have come close to," says Eisele, who maintains his image archive in his house in Stuttgart-Botnang.

German-German duels in motorsport

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-dangerous

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German-German racing history: At the Avus race in July 1951, Paul Greifzu was in front of Toni Ulmen in a Veritas Formula 2 racing car with a self-built BMW.

Source: Prototype car museum

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The Vertias Meteor Formula 2 car in the museum’s exhibition rooms.

Source: PROTOTYP automobile museum

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Porsche fishes Formula waters Porsche

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Start of the 1.5-liter racing sports car at the Eifel race in June 1953. Arthur Rosenhammer (139) from the EMW racing collective is in the lead ahead of Helmut Glockler (131) in the Porsche 550 Spyder.

Source: PROTOTYP automobile museum

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-formula

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Reckless men in quick boxes. Hans Roth on AFM and on the other side …

Source: Prototype car museum

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Source Werner Eisele Werner Eisele

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… GDR pilot Edgar Barth on EMW.

Source: PROTOTYP automobile museum

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Porsche fishes Formula waters Porsche

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13 racing cars are presented in the Hamburg exhibition.

Source: Prototype car museum

As a works photographer for Porsche, he experiences how Ferdinand Piëch brings his mechanics to the engine test stands at midnight before the 24-hour race in Le Mans. He is allowed into the relaxation room, in which Jochen Rindt is dozing on a folding couch during a break from the long-distance classic, he portrays the charismatic "racing baron" Fritz Huschke von Hanstein with a scarf and polo shirt at the wheel of an RSK Spyder 1962. "Porsche was my living room" says Eisele. His ties to Piëch endure, the VW patriarch recently invited him to Salzburg.

Cockpits burst like eggshells

Eisele begins to photograph Wolfgang Graf Berghe von Trips, "by then he was already dead". The German Ferrari driver dies at the Italian Grand Prix in Monza in 1961. Eisele said he could feel the drivers’ uncertainty before every race. Champion Emerson Fittipaldi, who looks like a rock star with his long black hair, the scars and the pilot glasses on his face, speaks of fear of death: “It was like before a battle. At the first drivers briefing you ask yourself: Which drivers will be missing at the end of the season? "

When the Trabi started in the Monte Carlo Rally

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Porsche fishes Formula waters Porsche

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In 1957 a pilot series of 50 Trabants was built. The series began in the summer of 1958 at the VEB automobile plant in Zwickau.

Source: Getty Images

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However, cars were not a matter of course in the GDR. Many citizens had to wait up to 14 years for a car – but that does not mean that the streets in the GDR were emptyaren. For example, this photo shows everyday traffic on Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse in Berlin.

Source: picture-alliance / Berlin_Pictur

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Only a few people know today that there was even a motorsport scene in the GDR.

Source: Wolfgang Kiebling

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-formula

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Trabis and Wartburgs took part several times in the legendary Monte Carlo Rally from 1968 to 1973.

Source: Wolfgang Kiebling

Photography: Formula 1 can be so wild and dangerous-Source Werner Eisele Werner Eisele

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In contrast to the competition, the participants from the GDR not only had to have driving skills, but also a lot of improvisation.

Source: Wolfgang Kiebling

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The vehicles could not be overheard with their rang-tang-tang-tang. At least in terms of engine power, the rally Trabis differed from the production version: it performsen 46 instead of the usual 26 hp.

Source: Wolfgang Kiebling

The curves on the racetracks are monsters, in a crash the cockpits can burst like eggshells. In 1976 Niki Lauda climbed back into his car to chase the title seven weeks after he nearly burned himself on the Nurburgring’s Nordschleife.

The successors, on the other hand, are much more firmly rooted. Predictable, well-behaved, professional, but just as fascinating for Eisele. Now when he takes photos on the route, he looks for parallels to the golden era of Formula 1. He finds the revenant of Jack Brabham in the taciturn Ferrari driver Kimi Raikkonen. He sometimes recognizes the young Michael Schumacher in the talented charioteer Sebastian Vettel.

Speed, celebrities characterize the pictures – and beautiful women. The difference in style between women racing drivers at the time like Helen Stewart, Nina Rindt and Marlene Lauda and today’s driver wives and pit sluts could hardly be greater. The companions used to have an assigned role in the team, for example with a stopwatch around their neck as timekeepers. "It hurts me," says Eisele, "when I see the drivers’ wives in the pits sealed off behind a glass wall today."

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