Risk of electric shock when charging e-cars at unearthed sockets

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With many electric cars you get "wiped out" if you charge them from improperly connected sockets

Risk of electric shock when charging e-cars at unearthed sockets-risk

Risk of electric shock when charging an electric car? At first glance, that doesn’t sound very believable. After all, electric cars haven’t just been charged since yesterday. If you hadn’t heard of such a problem long ago?

Well, there is probably no danger at charging stations, wall boxes and most household sockets, but there is at unearthed household sockets. This is now reported by Stefan Moeller, the active boss of the electric car rental company Nextmove.

Moeller experienced the problem first-hand: while on vacation in Croatia, he charged his almost new Hyundai Ioniq 5 at the household socket of the rented holiday home. While clearing the trunk, he was suddenly electrocuted.

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The cause of the mishap was the household socket used: It was not earthed, which is still relatively common in southern and eastern Europe. But even in this country, earthing was sometimes neglected, Moeller learned during his research.

During the charging process, there is generally a voltage between the body and the ground. This voltage is diverted from an earthed socket. Without grounding, on the other hand, a potential builds up. If you are walking barefoot or with wet shoes on wet ground and you touch an unpainted (or even just wet) body part, you get "wiped".

In the case of Moeller’s Hyundai Ioniq 5, neither the standard charging cable for the household socket nor the on-board charger prevented charging. In tests on various models from the Nextmove rental car fleet, Moeller found that this is not an isolated case. Moeller also measured the voltage built up and, in some cases, the amperage. This sometimes resulted in voltages over 140 volts and currents up to 1.9 milliamps (Hyundai Ioniq 5):

Risk of electric shock when charging e-cars at unearthed sockets-shock

The measurement results for different models

Even an alternating voltage of 50 volts or more is considered hazardous to health for adults, and a limit of 25 volts applies to children, according to Moeller’s research.

But there are also manufacturers who prevent charging from unearthed sockets:

Risk of electric shock when charging e-cars at unearthed sockets-shock

Models that do not pose a risk of electric shock

With the VW ID.4 and Audi e-tron GT, the supplied emergency charging cable (i.e. the one for the household socket) prevents charging from a non-earthed socket. You are even better protected with the Renault Zoe, who, according to Moeller, is decried as a loading bitch in the scene. In this case, however, it protects people: like the largely identical Smart, it recognizes when charging is to be carried out at an ungrounded socket and prevents the charging process.

Moeller believes that all car manufacturers should actually prevent charging from non-earthed sockets. Until then, you should check dubious sockets with a cheap socket tester (for 15 euros) to be on the safe side.

More about security: Risk of electric shock when charging e-cars at unearthed sockets-shock Paris introduces a speed limit of 30 km / h on most roads

Risk of electric shock when charging e-cars at unearthed sockets-risk Hyundai Kona and Ioniq: Gigantic recall for 82,000 electric cars

Stefan Moeller’s video is worth seeing and informative. You just have to overlook the advertising blocks on your own behalf:

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