VW boss Diess calls for a European “master plan” for e-car charging infrastructure

VW boss Diess calls for a European

At the group’s New Year’s reception in Brussels, Volkswagen boss Herbert Diess proposed a number of measures that could accelerate the market penetration of electric cars and the reduction of CO2 emissions. On the one hand, he expressed the desire for a European “master plan” for more electric car charging stations. The VW boss believes that “binding expansion targets for the individual member states” are necessary so that the development of a European charging network for electric cars can progress more quickly. The EU has the task of “helping those countries that have the greatest catching-up process ahead of them. We need a European master plan for e-mobility.”

Diess believes that electric cars could only be popular with customers if there were a sufficient number of charging points across Europe. One million charging points is a very realistic goal. The VW boss described the Netherlands as particularly progressive when it came to expanding the charging network, while Germany was at best in the middle. “The Netherlands has almost 20 charging points per 100 kilometers of road, in Germany there are fewer than three,” said Diess.

At the same time, Diess called for “a European coal phase-out plan with binding phase-out dates for every member state”. Otherwise Europe has “no chance of achieving the climate goals.He strongly criticized the high proportion of coal in European power generation, above all Germany because of the comparatively large number of coal-fired power plants and Eastern Europe. Seven of the ten largest carbon dioxide emitters are in Germany.

At the World Economic Forum in Davos a few days ago, Diess had already demanded a significantly higher CO2 price. For the coming year, the federal government is initially targeting EUR 25 per tonne, with the CO2 price gradually increasing. Now he reiterated that politicians should “be bolder” when it comes to CO2 prices.

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8 thoughts on “VW boss Diess calls for a European “master plan” for e-car charging infrastructure”

  1. Does the man actually know what he’s talking about.At 10,000 km per year, the power consumption of a private household roughly doubles with an electric car.Nevertheless, he calls for an even faster phase-out of coal, nuclear power anyway. On some winter days, renewables generate just 4% of demand. Rivets in pinstripes…

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  2. Should the state pay again?? What are these gentlemen thinking?? Is it too good?? Begged Tesla for money? And they weren’t worth billions when they. IT have started building superbatches

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  3. Politicians should have demanded the following for a long time: for new buildings or major renovations, every 3rd. parking lot, an empty pipe must be laid from the feed fuse box. The costs for this are zero. But if a renter now wants an e-car, he can upgrade his parking space with little effort/cost, where he can stay at night(!) can charge his e-car. This is also more ecological than during the day (!) at a public charging station. Today, a renter with an e-car does not have this option.

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  4. In Germany, every car drives an average of 40 km a day. That is 8 kWh per vehicle. Charging can take place between midnight and 6 a.m. during off-peak hours or when the electricity is generated from renewable sources. Technically, no problem anymore. Man just have to want it.

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  5. Again this this … &# 128521;
    He should focus on running the company properly. VW led the diesel scandal and got off almost “scot-free” outside the US. It reminds me a bit of his call for German politicians to focus exclusively on BEVs. Is this really the right man at the top??
    I also don’t think that the ID3 is THE car for everyone. In my eyes, the rigid wheelbase of the first platform is a mistake. Who really needs 15cm of knee room in the 2nd. row? A lot of space is wasted here. Above all, families with children or taxi drivers need a flexible trunk.
    The balancing act for VW is certainly difficult. It would need a tip that radiates optimism… Brave into the new times!

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  6. Tesla drivers, I often do the same thing, charging with only 10 amps. So you can still charge cheaply even when the sky is overcast without additional expensive daytime electricity. Is also better for the BATTERY than always fast charging. Says TESLA itself.

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  7. Why not look boldly into the future? One should not only admire and praise TESLA. A joint charging network with them would not be the stupidest thing. In view of the fact that the exchangeable battery is coming, the rear-wheel drive has had its day. In between, trailing arm or semi-trailing arm axle, the favorable fit of the BMW i 3 battery would already fit today. “Schnellkonect” as with a cordless screwdriver feasible for quick replacement. With TESLA this can be done in 5 minutes. The first batteries will now come to EXODUS. You also have to think about the installation costs. A battery from the i 3 is easier to set up in the basement than that from the Model S TESLA.

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  8. Mr. Diess and the other European scam companies only demand, demand and demand. The taxpayers, including those who don’t have a car, of course, should pay for everything. The profits are then reclaimed by the established scammers.
    How about if the “super clever” Mr. Diess did it like Elon Musk and set up charging stations and superchargers on his own??? Of course he never came up with such an idea !!! Financially it should be very easy if you are the world’s largest car manufacturer next to Toyota. It was also possible for the small startup company from California (Tesla). Instead, people only made fun of e-mobility in the past. Now you stand in front of the shambles and lament. And the deceived citizens should be asked to pay again and finance everything for the German car industry. Hopefully the politicians aren’t so stupid and play along. I don’t have much hope though.

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